Wednesday, February 8, 2012

Outlook 2011 is here to stay. Now the FAQ's


Some of you might already be on Outlook 2011 for mac. Their flagship replacement for entourage. We see it as a nice upgrade from Entourage and the old Mac mail


Here are the FAQ's about it and usage:

Office 2011: Outlook FAQ

Everything you wanted to know about Microsoft's Entourage-replacement.

There are alot of questions on the functions of Outlook 2011. This is a compilation of answers from microsoft and peers.

Migration

Will Outlook import everything from an existing Entourage installation (accounts, contacts, mail, calendar events, categories, and so on)?
Yes. You can import data files created in Entourage 2004, 2008, and Entourage EWS, as well as those created in Outlook 2003 for Windows or later. Everything you’ve listed, as well as projects, will import.
After years of using Windows (and Office), I’ve just switched to a Mac. Can I move my mailboxes and archived mail from my Windows installation to Office 2011? What about templates, rules, and other items contained in .nk2, .xml, .srs, .oft, and other file types?
Yes. You can import Windows PST and those other files to your Mac.
Can I sync Entourage notes with Outlook?
Yes.
Will I still be able to use Entourage if I install Office 2011?
Yes.
Will Outlook import directly from Apple's Mail, iCal, and Address Book?
Outlook 2011 will sync contacts from Address Book, and you can sync e-mail accounts with Mail. However, Outlook 2011 won’t sync events or tasks from iCal (in part because Microsoft’s primary design goal with Outlook was to make it work with Exchange).
Is there an Entourage converter utility?
Outlook handles the data conversion natively.

Exchange

What are the Exchange server requirements for using Outlook?
Outlook for Mac 2011 requires Exchange Server 2007 Service Pack 1 or later. It won’t work with earlier versions of Exchange.
Does Outlook still use Exchange Web Services (EWS) for e-mail? Or does it use WebDAV or MAPI?
Outlook uses EWS. The company says it has not plans to move to WebDAV or MAPI.
Does Outlook support delegates when using an Exchange server?
Yes, Outlook supports delegate settings across the Mac and PC.
Can I view shared, editable calendars of coworkers on the same Exchange Server?
Outlook 2011 automatically consolidates multiple calendars—such as a shared Exchange calendar—in an overlay view. Among other things, it lets you compare schedules without switching windows.
To access my company’s Exchange server today, I point Entourage at the address we use for Webmail (which uses Outlook Web App [OWA] and is accessible to the Internet.) One benefit is that I can access my corporate e-mail through Entourage without being logged into the corporate VPN. Is this possible in Outlook?
Yes. You can connect Outlook to Exchange without the VPN.
Does Outlook support Kerberos authentication?
Yes.
Does Outlook for Mac 2011 allow you to manipulate Exchange server-side rules, as the Windows version does?
No.
Will the new Outlook have push e-mail?
Outlook checks for new mail on the Exchange server every minute. Push notifications were added in Exchange 2010, and Microsoft says it’s looking at adding support for them in a future version of Outlook.
Does Outlook 2011 have an option to disable Cached Exchange Mode (as you can in Outlook for Windows), so it does not copy everything to your hard drive?
No.
Will Outlook for Mac support Custom Distribution Groups at the server level?
No. Outlook for Mac doesn’t support personal distribution lists at this time.

Interoperability

Will Outlook sync with MobileMe?
Outlook 2011 supports MobileMe’s contacts; you can also sync your MobileMe e-mail account with Outlook 2011. Outlook 2011 does not support MobileMe calendar or tasks.
Can Outlook sync with iCal?
No. (See “Will Outlook import directly from Apple Mail, iCal, and Address Book?” above.)
Can Outlook sync with Gmail and Google Calendar?
Outlook 2011 will work with Gmail accounts and contacts, but not with Google Calendar.
Does Outlook support CalDAV?
No.
Will Outlook's calendar and contacts sync easily with the iPhone?
Because the iPhone supports Exchange accounts, and because Outlook is designed primarily for use with Exchange servers, you should be able to access your e-mail, calendar, contacts, and tasks with your iPhone; you should also be able to work with your company’s global address list and calendars.
I keep a PC Outlook PST file on my USB drive at work. Will the new Outlook for Mac be able to read it and allow changes back home on my iMac and still cooperate with Outlook for Windows at work? In other words, can I shuttle the single PST file back and forth between OSs?
Yes, you can import the PST files to your Mac; they’ll be converted to OLM. You’ll then have to use an export tool to convert those files back to PST so they can be used on your PC.
My secretary uses Windows, but I use a Mac. Will I be able to allow her to view and make changes to my Calendar if I’m using Outlook 2011 and she’s using Outlook for Windows?
Yes.
Does Outlook 2011 have an Outlook Connector to connect to Windows Live accounts, like its Windows counterpart?
The Outlook Social Connector in Windows will not work with Outlook for Mac 2011. However, it will sync with Windows Live e-mail accounts through POP.
With the new database architecture in Outlook, can I store the database in the cloud (on MobileMe, say, or SkyDrive), and then access it from multiple computers?
You can store files on SkyDrive (or, if you’re a corporate or enterprise user, on SharePoint). MobileMe is not supported.
Does Outlook support Hotmail syncing?
Outlook 2011 will sync e-mail with Windows Live Hotmail accounts. However, it won't sync calendars, contacts, or tasks from those accounts.

Other features

Does the Mac version have the drag-and-drop features (such as making an appointment from a contact) that the Windows version has?
Right now, the only way you can do this is via AppleScript. Microsoft says that it’s looking into making these kinds of features native in a future version, but it has no concrete plans to do so right now.
Can you open .msg files?
Yes.
Can Outlook Notes be exported to a more standard format—such as .docx?
You can drag them to the desktop, where they’ll be saved as .html files.
Does Outlook for Mac have the Journal feature found in the Windows version?
Yes.
Does the calendar allow you to default to a week view? (In Entourage, you had to switch to the week view manually every time; the program wouldn’t remember your last view or default to a selected view.)
Yes. You can set week view as the default.
Do Outlook Notes share the same categories as the rest of the app?
Yes.
Does Outlook do data recognition, like Mail?
No. Because there are no APIs that would let third-party developers do the same data-detection thing as Mail, Outlook can’t do it.
Can you assign tasks or delegate task management?
No.
Does Outlook 2011 support mail templates, so you don’t have to re-create e-mails with common content every time?
No. It does not support mail templates.
Can you make Outlook use the Mac OS Address Book as the default contact list?
You can sync the two, bringing your Address Book into Outlook automatically.
Entourage included links between items. Will Outlook also include links between items?
No. Microsoft says that this feature was left out of Outlook due to low usage and reliability.
Outlook for Windows allows you to configure the calendar pane so that two time zones appear. Does Outlook 2011 do this?
No.
Can you view mail headers and raw message source in Outlook 2011?
Yes. Right-click a message in the item list and select View Source.
Does Outlook’s task manager support subtasks?
No, that isn’t supported on the Mac or on Windows.

Have any questions? Need help installing Outlook 2011 or office 2011 for your corporate users? Give us a call.



Garett Chipman
CEO | TVG Consulting
Providing IT Operations and Telecom Services
"When you need IT, think of TVG"
818-579-7370 x 205
www.TVGConsulting.com

It service Los angeles,it support los angeles,  It consulting Los Angeles, It consulting Burbank, it consulting 91601, it consulting north Hollywood, phone system Burbank, it consulting Santa Monica, computer support Santa Monica, it consulting woodland hills, Computer support 91620, network consultant 91601, it consulting Sherman oaks, it consulting Sherman oaks, computer consulting 91601, phone system north Hollywood, it consulting Encino, phone system encino, computer support north Hollywood, computer consultant Burbank, computer consultant encino, computer support encino, small business computer support los angeles, computer support Burbank, small business computer consultant burbank, small business computer consultant Los Angeles, it consulting los angeles,phone system los angeles, business it support encino, business techsupport encino,

Friday, February 3, 2012

Pain relief for Excel Headaches


Have you ever wondered if Microsoft Excel was invented by a sadist?
Trying to edit multiple files at one time becomes a game of "Find the worksheet." You know that the feature you need is on one of the ribbons, but which one? And a large, funky workbook file can slow the program down so much, you need to take a coffee break after altering a single number.
Let's face it: If you do a significant amount of important work in Excel, you're dealing with one nightmare after another. And if you find that using Excel is more difficult than tracking your finances with a pencil and paper, something isn't adding up properly.
I'm here to help, with solutions to five common nightmares found in Excel 2007 and 2010. I'll tell you how to manage multiple workbooks effortlessly, speed up a slow file, track changes from multiple users, find the feature you need among all the ribbons, and enter data more easily.

1. Multiple Open Workbooks Maximize Hassles

In Excel you have two clear and obvious ways to work on three or more spreadsheets: You can have too-small windows that don't give you the big picture, or you can clumsily switch between them.
Arrange your windows so that you can see multiple workbook files at the same time.Arrange your windows so that you can see multiple workbook files at the same time.
When you launch Excel, it opens a single window on the Windows desktop. When you open or create another workbook (an Excel file that can contain one or more worksheets), that opens an internal window within the Excel window. You can maximize internal windows so that each one fills the entire Excel window, or restore them to view them all at once.
Unless your worksheets are exceptionally small, you should keep the inner windows maximized (the default setting) so that they fill the whole Excel window. You can switch between worksheets by pressing Ctrl-Tab or, to go in the other direction, Ctrl-Shift-Tab.
That approach works well if you have only two files open--but the more files you add, the more you might cycle through them, going in the wrong direction and then wasting time circling back. Another problem with the technique is that it doesn't allow you to examine two workbooks at the same time (which, depending on what you're doing, may come in handy).
Demaximize a spreadsheet's window by clicking the second Restore icon from the top.Demaximize a spreadsheet's window by clicking the second Restore icon from the top.For that, click a workbook's Restore button, which you can find below Excel's Restore button in the upper-right corner. Then you can resize and rearrange the windows for better viewing. You can also minimize those you don't want up at the moment.
If you use two monitors, click Excel's own Restore button so that the application is no longer maximized, and then drag the edge of Excel's window so that it fills both monitors. You'll have much more room for arranging windows.
Your final option--and the best in my opinion--is to download and install one of ExtendOffice'sOffice Tab products. These Office add-ins place each open file in its own tab at the top of the application window. You sacrifice a small amount of screen space, but gain the ability to switch easily between multiple windows. The free edition adds tabs to Word and PowerPoint as well as to Excel, and can handle pretty much everything you need it to do.
ExtendOffice's Office Tab lets you switch easily between open files.ExtendOffice's Office Tab lets you switch easily between open files.

2. One Superslow File

You double-click a worksheet in Windows Explorer and wait for it to load into Excel. And wait. And wait. Finally, it loads. You change a number, and then you wait some more.
It's hard to say why a particular Excel workbook file becomes so slow that it's unbearable to use. Here are three common culprits and what you can do about them.
Too many calculations: In complex workbooks, changing one number can affect hundreds of reiterative calculations, and Excel takes time to work out each one.
The solution is to turn off automatic calculations, which you can do from the Options dialog box. To get there in Excel 2010, click the File tab, and then select Options in the left pane. In Excel 2007, click the round Office button, and then click the Excel Options button at the bottom of the drop-down menu.
Once you're in the Options dialog box, select Formulas in the left pane. For Workbook Calculations, select Manual.
Just remember that the numbers won't be correct until you either save the file or press F9.
Too much formatting: A spreadsheet doesn't have to be pretty, so use as little formatting as you need to keep it legible.
If a spreadsheet behaves too slowly, try clearing the formatting.If a spreadsheet behaves too slowly, try clearing the formatting.To find out if formatting is slowing down the file, make a copy of it and open the copy in Excel. Select the entire worksheet by pressing Ctrl-A. If the workbook has more than one worksheet, hold down Shift while you click the last tab at the bottom of the window so that you select all of the worksheets. Then, in the Home ribbon's Editing section, click the drop-down arrow by the Clear icon (which looks like an eraser) and select Clear Formats. Save the file.
If this new file is significantly faster than the old one, you overformatted the original file.
The file is bigger than it needs to be: It's no surprise that big files are slower. But some big files can benefit by slimming down.
To find out if your file is one of those, press Ctrl-End, which takes you to the last cell in the worksheet. Yes, you can see other cells below and to the right, but Excel doesn't actually save them until you put something in them.
If the cell you land in is far below the last row containing any content, or far to the right of the last such column, you have a file with unnecessary overhead.
The solution? Copy the actually used cells to a new worksheet in the same workbook, and then delete the old worksheet.

3. Features Are Lost in the Ribbon Labyrinth

Quick: Do you know on which ribbon you can find the Page Layout icon? Hint: It isn't the Page Layout ribbon.
The ribbon interface, introduced with Office 2007, is supposed to make Excel and other applications easier to use. Sometimes it does--and sometimes it leaves you clicking ribbons in a time-wasting search.
Install Search Commands, and you'll never have to click through the ribbons looking for the feature you want.Install Search Commands, and you'll never have to click through the ribbons looking for the feature you want.
Search Commands, a free add-on from Microsoft Office Labs, takes care of the problem. Once you install the add-on, it presents a ribbon where you can search for commands.
(By the way, the Page Layout icon is on the View ribbon.)

4. Changes From Multiple Users Pile Up

If you and a coworker both edit the same workbook, you have a problem. If three or four of you fiddle with the same file over the network, you have a potential catastrophe.
Luckily, everything you need to keep the workflow under control is in one place: the Review ribbon. Here are three essential tools on the ribbon that can help you.
See changes at a glance: Want to see who made what changes when? Drop down the Track Changes menu and select Highlight Changes. Then fill in the options. You can control how long the changes will be saved, whose changes need to be tracked, and whether they should be listed on a separate sheet. You can also accept or reject changes.
Protect your spreadsheet before you let other people fiddle with it. You'll sleep better.Protect your spreadsheet before you let other people fiddle with it. You'll sleep better.
Protect all or part of the file: The Protect Sheet and Protect Workbook options allow you to control who can change what. Click either of those buttons, and you'll be able to password-protect various aspects of the file.
Share the workbook: The Share Workbook option permits more than one user to alter the spreadsheet simultaneously. And if you're thinking that such a setup could only make things worse, relax--if a conflict crops up at the time you save the file, a dialog box shows you both options and lets you choose.

5. Endless Data Entry

Spreadsheets aren't database programs, but everyone uses them as such, entering columns and rows of data into tables. Why not? It's a lot easier to set up a simple table in Excel than to create a real database in something like Access.
Here's why not: The data-entry process is a lot more difficult in Excel. A real database, after all, gives you a form for entering data, which is a lot friendlier than a spreadsheet's table layout.
The final step: Add the Form icon to the Quick Access Toolbar.The final step: Add the Form icon to the Quick Access Toolbar.
The fix is simple: Bring up a form for data entry in Excel. And doing that is as easy as selecting any cell in the table and clicking the Form icon.
Well, it's that easy after you've made the Form icon visible. Click the down arrow at the right end of the Quick Access Toolbar, and then select More Commands. In the 'Choose commands from' drop-down menu, select Commands Not in the Ribbon. Scroll down to and select Form. Click theAdd button.
Now you can select any cell in the table, and then click the Form icon. Up comes a data-entry form.
A simple form makes data entry much easier.A simple form makes data entry much easier.
If you don't know such Excel tricks, your nightmares will multiply, subtract from your general happiness, and allow your competitors to divide and conquer. Now that you know how to fix these nightmares, however, the power belongs to you. - via PCMAG

If you want more shortcuts and tips, we have a free Quick Tip 1-sheets on Excel, Word and Outlook to help you navigate through them faster.
Just goto our site, fill the form out on the bottom of the homepage, put QUICK TIPS in the Immediate Needs section and well send them to you for free.($45 value).  www.TVGConsulting.com
Next Tip: WORD Help


Garett Chipman
CEO | TVG Consulting
Providing IT Operations and Telecom Services
"When you need IT, think of TVG"
818-579-7370 x 205
www.TVGConsulting.com

It service Los angeles,it support los angeles,  It consulting Los Angeles, It consulting Burbank, it consulting 91601, it consulting north Hollywood, phone system Burbank, it consulting Santa Monica, computer support Santa Monica, it consulting woodland hills, Computer support 91620, network consultant 91601, it consulting Sherman oaks, it consulting Sherman oaks, computer consulting 91601, phone system north Hollywood, it consulting Encino, phone system encino, computer support north Hollywood, computer consultant Burbank, computer consultant encino, computer support encino, small business computer support los angeles, computer support Burbank, small business computer consultant burbank, small business computer consultant Los Angeles, it consulting los angeles,phone system los angeles, business it support encino, business techsupport encino,









Wednesday, February 1, 2012

Helpful Hints: EXCEL secret tricks


Would you like to create multiple lines of text within a cell? There's a keystroke for that. What if you want to reuse a chart's formatting on another chart, or print multiple worksheets on a single sheet of paper? Those aren't the only timesaving tools at your fingertips.

1. Make New Text Lines in a Cell

When you need to start a new line as you're typing text in a cell, use Alt-Enter.When you need to start a new line as you're typing text in a cell, use Alt-Enter.As you've probably already discovered, when you’re typing text into a cell and you want to start a new line of text, the Enter key doesn't produce the desired result. Pressing Enter merely places the text in the current cell and then selects the next cell.
Instead, to start a new line in Microsoft Excel, as you're typing text, press Alt-Enter. On the Mac, the key combination is Control-Option-Return.

2. Quickly Add Values in Cells

Need a quick tally of values in selected cells? Read it in the Status Bar.Need a quick tally of values in selected cells? Read it in the Status Bar.What do you do when you need a quick calculation, such as adding the values of two cells? Rather than typing a formula to do it, click once on the first cell to select it and then Ctrl-click the second cell. By default, the Status Bar--which runs along the foot of the Excel window--will show the result of adding the values in the selected cells (Sum).
You can also view other calculations in the Status Bar by right-clicking the Status Bar and choosing from the calculations listed there; aside from Sum, you'll find Average, Count, Numerical Count (the quantity of cells selected that contain numerical values), Minimum, and Maximum.

3. Create a Reusable Chart Template

Once you create a chart template, you can use it to format any future chart quickly.Once you create a chart template, you can use it to format any future chart quickly.Creating a series of charts for a project, such as an annual report, usually means that you need to format all of the charts similarly. Create a chart template for the design, and you can use it to create and format new charts in a flash.
First create one chart and format it as you want all of the charts to look in the future. To save the chart formatting and appearance (but not the data) as a template, choose Chart Tools, go to the Design tab, select Save as Template, and then type a name for your template. The entry in the Save As Type box should read 'Chart Template Files(*.crtx)'; if it doesn't, select that option from the drop-down list. Click Save.
To use this template to format a new chart, begin by selecting the data to chart. From the Ribbon toolbar, choose Insert, Other Charts, and then All Charts Types. Now click theTemplates option. From the My Templates group, select the template you saved, and click OK.Your new chart will have the same formatting as the chart template, saving you from having to do the work again yourself.

4. Format and Chart Far-Flung Data

The first step in charting and formatting sets of data that are far from one another is to select the data you need.The first step in charting and formatting sets of data that are far from one another is to select the data you need.Here's another quick timesaver: When you want to format a series of cells that don't appear side by side, start by selecting the first block of cells and then hold the Ctrl key as you select the second and subsequent blocks of cells. You can then apply a format, such as a font change or fill color, to all the selected cells.
You can use the same technique to chart cells that don’t appear side by side, as well. For example, if you need to create a chart from a table of data using the headings in the first column and the data from the fourth column, first select the headings in the first column. Then hold Ctrl as you select the matching data in the cells in the fourth column. Afterward, create a chart, just as you would any regular chart.

5. Keep an Eye on Data With a Watch Window

Using a Watch Window, you can view the values in cells not visible on your current screen.Using a Watch Window, you can view the values in cells not visible on your current screen.When you’re editing a very large worksheet, often you need to view how your changes in one area affect totals and other calculations in cells that currently sit off-screen, either farther down the page or on another worksheet tab. Instead of repeatedly moving back and forth from your working data area to the cells that show the results you're interested in, use a Watch Window to display the values of the cells in the other part of the worksheet as you tinker.
To set up a Watch Window, click the left mouse button within one cell that you want to watch. From the Ribbon toolbar, choose Formulas, Watch Window. When the Watch Window dialog box appears, click Add Watch. Because you've already selected the cell, you simply need to confirm that the reference to it in the dialog box is correct, and then click Add.
Now return to the area of your worksheet that you're editing. As you do so, you'll see that the Watch Window floats atop the worksheet, allowing you to work on your data. While you edit, the Watch Window shows the other cells, reflecting the changes you're making. You can move and resize the Watch Window as you wish, and use the Add Watch button to view additional cells in the Watch Window--even cells on another sheet--so that you can track the results in multiple cells as you work.

6. Make Formulas Easier to Understand

Using named ranges makes writing and troubleshooting formulas easier in Excel worksheets.Using named ranges makes writing and troubleshooting formulas easier in Excel worksheets.Sometimes formulas are not as clear as they could be. A formula that looks like '=C2*C5', for instance, is much harder to understand at a glance than one that reads, say, '=TaxRate*C5'. You can create formulas that use names (like 'TaxRate') instead of cell references (like 'C2') if you give common names to the cell or cells containing data you use repeatedly in calculations.

For example, if you were to name a cell 'TaxRate', later on you could use that name in a calculation, such as in the formula '=TaxRate*C5', which multiplies the value in cell C5 by the value of the cell you've named 'TaxRate'.To name a range, click the cell or select the range of cells to name. From the Ribbon toolbar, choose Formulas, Define Name, and then type a name in the Name box. The name should start with a character, not a number, and although you can't use spaces, you can use an underscore character if you wish. Click OK.
You can easily access named cells or ranges later.You can easily access named cells or ranges later.When you have named cells on a worksheet, you can find any of those cells or ranges by clicking in the Name box, which appears at the far left of the Formula Bar under the Ribbon toolbar. Click the drop-down arrow in the Name box to view a list of all named ranges, and click one to go immediately to that area on the worksheet.

7. Format Large Values as Rounded Thousands and Millions

Use a custom format to show large numbers as rounded, simplified values.Use a custom format to show large numbers as rounded, simplified values.Large numbers, such as thousands and millions, are often easier to work with as a rounded number than the exact value. You can set the cells containing large values to the nearest number of thousands using a custom Excel format.
First select the cell or range to round off. Next, right-click the selection and choose Format Cells, Number. From the Category list in the Format Cells dialog box, select Custom. In the Type box, type ###, "k" and click OK. This format will round up the number to a whole number of thousands and display it with the letter k after it. For example, the number 21,678.22 will display as '22k'. Likewise, to format a number in the millions, create a custom formula that reads ###,,"m".
In addition to using this number format in your worksheets, you can apply it when formatting the axes of your charts. To format a chart axis this way, right-click the axis and choose Format Axis.Then choose the Number group and set up your custom format by typing it in the Format Codebox.
This format controls only how the numbers appear on your worksheet or chart axis, and does not affect the cell's value. Therefore, Excel will use the actual value in a cell when the cell is referred to in a calculation.

8. Print Multiple Sheets on One Page

One thing that’s impossible to do in Excel using any built-in command or option is to print data from multiple sheets in a workbook onto a single sheet of paper. Instead, Excel always starts a new sheet of paper for each sheet in the workbook.
You can assemble snapshots of data from multiple worksheets into one worksheet for printing on a single sheet of paper.You can assemble snapshots of data from multiple worksheets into one worksheet for printing on a single sheet of paper.You have a workaround, however, that involves using the Camera tool. To start, you need to add the Camera icon to a toolbar; the easiest one to use is the Quick Access Toolbar. Click the down-pointing arrow to the right of the QAT, and choose More Commands. From the drop-down list in the right panel of the Excel Options dialog box, choose Commands Not in the Ribbon. In the panel below, select the Camera icon and click Add to put it in the QAT. Click Close.
Then, select the first range to print, and take a snapshot of it by clicking the Camera icon. Move to a new worksheet, and click in the cell where the top-left corner of the snapshot should appear. Immediately, once you click there, the snapshot image will appear.
Now go to the second area that you want to print, select it, take a snapshot of it, and repeat the process of adding that snapshot to the same sheet as before. Continue to assemble all the data you need to print. Because the snapshots are all located on a single worksheet, you can now print them on one sheet of paper. Note, too, that the snapshots are linked to the original data, so if you make changes to the original data, the data in the snapshots will update automatically.

9. Borrow Table Formats for Your Excel Data

You can remove some table formatting while preserving the table itself.You can remove some table formatting while preserving the table itself.Using the 'Format as Table' command on the Home tab of the Ribbon toolbar applies a neat format to a list of data in Excel. Unfortunately, it also adds filters to your column headings and changes the behavior of columns and rows adjacent to the list. If you want the convenience and simplicity of applying table formats with a single click, but don't want the other features applied at the same time, you can easily remove the extras.
To see this at work, select your list, including the heading row. Apply a table format to it by selecting theFormat as Table option on the Home tab of the Ribbon. Click a table style to apply it to your list. When the Format As Table dialog box appears, select the My table has headers checkbox, then click OK--your data will be neatly formatted.
To remove the other features that Excel adds automatically to your list, keep the list selected. Choose Table Tools and then the Design tab, and select the Convert to Range option. When Excel asks, 'Do you want to convert the table to a normal range?' click Yes. This action removes the filters from the column headings, and removes other table-specific behavior, but leaves the formatting in place.

10. Create a Custom Data-Entry List

Use a Data Validation List to make selecting values to enter data into cells easy.Use a Data Validation List to make selecting values to enter data into cells easy.It's always quicker and more accurate to select an entry from a prepared list than to type the item yourself. So when you have a worksheet requiring common entries that could exist in a list, set them up that way.
To create such a list, in an empty sheet in the workbook type the list of items to choose from, in one column. Return to the sheet where you will use these items, and select the range into which they will be entered. ChooseData, Data Validation, Data Validation,and then click the Settings tab. In the Allow drop-down menu, select List. Click in the Source area, navigate to the sheet that contains the data, and select the cells containing the items you just typed. Click OK to close the dialog box.
Now, when you select one of the cells to which you just added the Data Validation option, you'll see a drop-down arrow appear. From the list that appears when you click the arrow, you can select the item to enter into that cell.  -From PCmag
If you want more shortcuts and tips, we have a free Quick Tip 1-sheets on Excel, Word and Outlook to help you navigate through them faster.
Just goto our site, fill the form out on the bottom of the homepage, put QUICK TIPS in the Immediate Needs section and well send them to you for free.($45 value).  www.TVGConsulting.com
Next Tip: How to Fix Excel Headaches.


Garett Chipman
CEO | TVG Consulting
Providing IT Operations and Telecom Services
"When you need IT, think of TVG"
818-579-7370 x 205
www.TVGConsulting.com

It service Los angeles,it support los angeles,  It consulting Los Angeles, It consulting Burbank, it consulting 91601, it consulting north Hollywood, phone system Burbank, it consulting Santa Monica, computer support Santa Monica, it consulting woodland hills, Computer support 91620, network consultant 91601, it consulting Sherman oaks, it consulting Sherman oaks, computer consulting 91601, phone system north Hollywood, it consulting Encino, phone system encino, computer support north Hollywood, computer consultant Burbank, computer consultant encino, computer support encino, small business computer support los angeles, computer support Burbank, small business computer consultant burbank, small business computer consultant Los Angeles, it consulting los angeles,phone system los angeles, business it support encino, business techsupport encino,